tasktimes / did

By on 1-01-2013 in Code

tasktimes / did

I don’t like tracking my time. Marking down the start and end times of a task and finding the difference is annoying. Although you can easily redirect the output of “date” to a file, you still have to calculate the difference. So I wrote something to do it for me. This sort of thing has been done before, but I didn’t know about the other solutions before making mine. I call it “tasktimes”. It’s written in C and you can get it on GitHub. If you’re on Windows and don’t have a C compiler, you might try the Tiny C Compiler.

From the command-line, you simply type:

task "TPS reports"

to start a task and later on type:

task off

to complete it. To get the report, type:

task times

and you’ll get something like:

--- Misc ---
2012/12/03 09:01:12 Mo ( 8:31:42) TPS reports
                 Total   8:31:42

After writing tasktimes, I thought I’d try making a simpler program to let you note whether you completed a certain task each day. Again, it’s easy to save dates to a file, but I wanted the analysis portion. It’s basically a “don’t break the chain“-style motivational program called “did”. It can also be found on GitHub and is also written in C.

From the command-line, you simply type:

did code

to log a task or

did code yest

to log a task done yesterday. Just typing “did” will give you the report.

      ########################################################################
 code #OOOO--OOOOO--OOOOO--OOOOO--OOOOO--OOOOO--OOOOO--OOOOO--OOOOO--OOOOO--O#
  exe #OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-OO-O#
write #-----------------------------------------------------------OOOOOOOOOOO#
      ########################################################################
 2013  0000000001111111111222222222233000000000111111111122222222200000000011
01-03  1234567890123456789012345678901123456789012345678901234567812345678901
       TWTFSSMTWTFSSMTWTFSSMTWTFSSMTWTFSSMTWTFSSMTWTFSSMTWTFSSMTWTFSSMTWTFSSM